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WELCOME TO

St michael’s ce academy

Phonics

 

At St Michael's we follow Letters and Sounds to teach phonics. Below you will find information on how children are taught to read and spell. There are accompanying resources which you can download, print and use at home with your child. 

Phonics Games

Phase 1

Phase 1 activities concentrate on developing children’s speaking and listening skills, phonological awareness and oral blending and segmenting. These activities are intended to be used as part of a broad and rich language curriculum that has speaking and listening at its centre, links language with physical and practical experiences, and provides an environment rich in print and abundant in opportunities to engage with books. Phase One activities pave the way for children to make a good start in reading and writing.

Phase 1 Activities

Name
Phase-One-A-Z-Alphabet-Activity-Powerpoint.ppsDownload
Showing 1-1 of 1

Phase 2

Children entering Phase Two will have experienced a wealth of listening activities, including songs, stories and rhymes. They will be able to distinguish between speech sounds and many will be able to blend and segment words orally. Some will also be able to recognise spoken words that rhyme and will be able to provide a string of rhyming words, but inability to do this does not prevent moving on to Phase Two as these speaking and listening activities continue.

The purpose of this phase is to teach at least 19 letters, and move children on from oral blending and segmentation to blending and segmenting with letters. By the end of the phase many children should be able to read some VC and CVC words and to spell them either using magnetic letters or by writing the letters on paper or on whiteboards. During the phase they will be introduced to reading two-syllable words and simple captions. They will also learn to read some high-frequency ‘tricky’ words: the, to, go, no.

Phase 2 Activities

 

Name
Ph2DHFW.pdfDownload
Ph2THFW.pdfDownload
FlashcardsSets67.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Phase 3

Children entering Phase Three will know around 19 letters and be able to blend phonemes to read VC words and segment VC words to spell. While many children will be able to read and spell CVC words, they all should be able to blend and segment CVC words orally.

The purpose of this phase is to teach another 25 graphemes, most of them comprising two letters (e.g. oa), so the children can represent each of about 42 phonemes by a grapheme (the additional phoneme /zh/ found in the word vision will be taught at Phase Five). Children also continue to practise CVC blending and segmentation in this phase and will apply their knowledge of blending and segmenting to reading and spelling simple two-syllable words and captions. They will learn letter names during this phase, learn to read some more tricky words and also begin to learn to spell some of these words.

Phase 3 Activities

Name
FlashcardsAsstPh3.pdfDownload
FlashcardsSetsCDVD.pdfDownload
FlashcardsSetsVD.pdfDownload
Ph3THFWTrucks.pdfDownload
Ph3DHFWTrucks.pdfDownload
Showing 1-5 of 5

Phase 4

The purpose of this phase is to consolidate children’s knowledge of graphemes in reading and spelling words containing adjacent consonants and polysyllabic words.

Children entering Phase Four will be able to represent each of 42 phonemes by a grapheme, and be able to blend phonemes to read CVC words and segment CVC words for spelling. They will have some experience in reading simple two-syllable words and captions. They will know letter names and be able to read and spell some tricky words.

Phase 4 Activities

Name
FlashcardsAsstPh4.pdfDownload
Ph4DHFW.pdfDownload
Ph4THFW.pdfDownload
Showing 1-3 of 3

Phase 5

The purpose of this phase is for children to broaden their knowledge of graphemes and phonemes for use in reading and spelling. They will learn new graphemes and alternative pronunciations for these and graphemes they already know, where relevant. Some of the alternatives will already have been encountered in the high-frequency words that have been taught. Children become quicker at recognising graphemes of more than one letter in words and at blending the phonemes they represent. When spelling words they will learn to choose the appropriate graphemes to represent phonemes and begin to build word-specific knowledge of the spellings of words.

Children entering Phase Five are able to read and spell words containing adjacent consonants and some polysyllabic words.

Phase 5 Activities

Name
AlternativeSpellings.pdfDownload
FlashcardsAsstPh5a.pdfDownload
FlashcardsPh5a1.pdfDownload
FlashcardsPh5a2.pdfDownload
Ph5DHFWTrucks.pdfDownload
Ph5THFWTrucks.pdfDownload
Showing 1-6 of 6

Phase 6

By the beginning of Phase Six, children should know most of the common grapheme– phoneme correspondences (GPCs). They should be able to read hundreds of words, doing this in three ways:

  • reading the words automatically if they are very familiar;
  • decoding them quickly and silently because their sounding and blending routine is
    now well established;
  • decoding them aloud.
    Children’s spelling should be phonemically accurate, although it may still be a little unconventional at times. Spelling usually lags behind reading, as it is harder.